Category Archives: children

Chalking on Campus

A few weeks ago, members of uOttawa Students for Life did some chalking around campus, helping to bring messages of truth and of love for preborn children and their mothers to our fellow students.

Abortion By The Numbers in Canada

The National Post recently published a very informative and sobering infographic that breaks down the number of abortions that happened in Canada in 2009 by province and age of mother and child. (Note that the data underestimates the number of abortions because they’re not all reported.) What will you do to help decrease the number of preventable deaths where you live?

On a similar note, it was recently reported that 491 babies were born alive and left to die following botched abortions in Canada from 2000 to 2009. Have you emailed your MP?

Christmas Baby Shower This Sunday!

Here at uOSFL, we are not just about trials, struggles, and controversy – although those are a given in our battleground! We are also about celebrating life, the gift of life, the joy of life!

We are pleased to announce our next Joys of Life event – our annual Christmas Baby Shower! It will be held this Sunday, December 9th, from 2pm to 5pm in Café Alternatif, 60 University Private (basement of Simard building). There will be food, mingling, and games. Bring a snack to share and a friend, and most importantly, bring a gift for a mother facing a difficult pregnancy! Gifts will be donated to First Place Pregnancy Centre. *UPDATE: clothes for babies 0-3 months, winter clothing and diapers are most appreciated.

This event is hosted by the University of Ottawa Students for Life, your pro-life club on campus. For more information, please visit our Facebook event and follow us on Twitter at @uosfl_epvuo.baby-christmas11

Acknowledging Reproductive Loss

Saturday’s workshop by Kathleen Gray of Montreal’s Centre for Reproductive Loss was full of practical insight and wisdom. So many families are affected by losses such as miscarriage, stillbirth, abortion, adoption, SIDS, infertility and sterility, and yet we have so few opportunities to express sympathy for the parents who experience very real grief. We shouldn’t be afraid to acknowledge reproductive loss; in fact, it is critically important for healing. Those interested in learning more about the Healing Process Model © should request a copy of Grieving Reproductive Loss: The Healing Process.

This work of art gracefully represents the sorrow felt by so many. Sculptor Martin Hudáčeka was commissioned by a group of mothers in Slovakia to create The Child Who Was Never Born.

Adoption – Stronger Because Of It

They say what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger (cue Kelly Clarkson) and that is even truer when it comes to giving life. Good for this girl for staying strong even when the men in her life tried to pressure her into “choice.”

He sat me down and told me I needed to have an abortion. My whole world came crashing down again. I have never cried so hard. I was lost, and the only man I knew truly loved me was telling me to do the same thing the boy I thought loved me said to do. I stood toe to toe with my father and told him no. I had more respect than that for myself and for God.

(…)

I’m so glad I chose life and gave Brett a chance at a good and happy life. He is a gift to everyone, and even though it was hard, I would never take back the journey I went through. I’m stronger because of it.

Here in Ottawa, FirstPlace Options, Birthright and Miriam Centre can provide information about local adoption services. AdoptioninCanada is a great website with information about the adoption process.

Coldhearted Calculus

by Marissa Poisson

One week ago, two major American newspapers published two very different stories. The Two-Minus-One Pregnancy examines the phenomenon of parents who select to “reduce” twins to singletons for mainly lifestyle considerations while How a D.C. area family with 11 children, ages 12 through 1, makes it work describes just that. The former features “Jenny” and her husband, who are “choosing to extinguish one of two healthy fetuses, almost as if having half an abortion,” though you can no more have half an abortion than you can be a little bit pregnant. (“Coin-toss abortion” is a more apt description, unless of course the parents are choosing one child over another based on their sex.) In the latter, we read about Jen and Larry Kilmer, who have welcomed their children one after another with open arms.

In reading one article after the other, I was struck by how it all came down to a matter of perspective. The parents electing to have a shot of potassium chloride injected into one or more of their healthy babies’ hearts in the article are financially stable, married and often did everything they could to become pregnant in the first place, but they want precisely one child to be born. Still, on one level they know what they are doing is wrong. “This is bad, but it’s not anywhere as bad as neglecting your child or not giving everything you can to the children you have,” says Jenny. But what does it mean to give everything you can to your children? “I feel very strongly that the best gift you can give a child is a sibling,” says Jen.

The first article states, “Whatever the particulars, these patients concluded that they lacked the resources to deal with the chaos, stereophonic screaming and exhaustion of raising twins.” Jen, on the other hand, says, “People are always asking, ‘How do you have time for yourself?’ But when you realize there’s more to life than yourself. . . I think time to yourself is overrated.” Even the author of the “reduction” piece, referring to her own situation, says, “There’s no doubt that life with twins and a third child so close in age has often felt all-consuming and out of control. And yet the thought of not having any one of them is unbearable now, because they are no longer shadowy fetuses but full-fledged human beings whom I love in a huge and aching way.” The crux of it is not the specific number of children in a family but rather that those “shadowy fetuses” are already fully human; they are the same individuals who elicit that huge and aching love.

Now that Jenny has subtracted one of her twins, she will be able to set aside twice as much money for the child who emerges from her womb alive, and it’s true that the Kilmers don’t have college funds for their children. But I have no doubt as to which family is richer. As Mother Theresa said, “It is a poverty to decide that a child must die so that you may live as you wish.”

More articles on “selective reductions” here, here, here and here. To read them is to weep.

*New, heartbreaking article by a father who recently lost two of his triplets: The New Scar on My Soul