Category Archives: Uncategorized

Beautiful Poem: Ghost in the House

Found on Big Blue Wave, this poem was written by a woman named Amanda and sent in a letter to Priests for Life. It is beautiful and haunting.

Ghost in the House~

Come, child. It’s evening. Come to me
And sit with me once more.
Let’s rock here while the others sleep.
Let’s see — your sister’s four;
The baby is three months today;
Your little brother’s two,
And I have not decided if I’ll tell them about you.

And you, you would be eight this year.
I do not know your name.
The color of your eyes, or hair,
Or where, or how, to blame.
The fear was all, the fear of change,
For I saw change as loss.
Against my dreams, my plans, my life
You seemed so small a cost,
Not knowing how your presence
Altered how I felt and thought,
Not knowing how you changed me
In the mix the hormones brought.
And you were not a child to me
But sickness, pain, and fear —
But oh, I know, I know you now,
Now that these three are here!
Your scent, your weight within my arms,
Your head upon my breast –
I did not know these things when I decided what was best.

And I am lost and so confused
And don’t know how to feel,
For you, who were an illness,
Every year become more real;
Your sister and your brothers,
They proclaim you as they grow.
They make it harder still to face
The coldest truth I know:
That knowing – feeling – only
What I knew and felt back then,
I cannot say I would not make
This saddest choice again.

Oh! My little lost unknown,
My first and neverborn,
Forgive the ignorance that sent you
To the dark, unmourned!

And no, it isn’t every day
I find your shadow here;
Most times I’m far too busy
For reflection or for tears,
But sometimes, when the children sleep
And I have time alone,
I sit down in the dark, and rock,
And bring my baby home.

_____________________________

Healing is possible after abortion. Groups like Rachel’s Vineyard offer caring, confidential retreats and there are numbers to call like the National Helpline for Abortion Recovery: 1-866-482-LIFE.

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“Surely We Have An Obligation To Try”

All children are precious and we absolutely do have an obligation to try to keep them safe from harm. Obama’s words should apply to protecting them in all circumstances:

“Are we prepared to say that such violence visited on our children year after year after year is somehow the price of our freedom?” 

Enigma Solved?

Funny how in most contexts it isn’t hard for people to figure out when life begins:

They’ll team up on research and teaching that focuses on the first 2,000 days of a child’s life – from conception to age five – in the hopes of pinpointing ways to set children on positive life trajectories.

(…)

If you think about it, the miracle that has to occur from the time in which the egg is fertilized, when you have one single cell, to the time when 2,000 days later, you’ve got a healthy, jumping, happy, enthusiastic, inquisitive individual going off to school, and you think of the biology that has to happen during that period – to me, that’s nothing short of a miracle.

Another Cool Pre-Natal Development Video

by Dante De Luca

This presentation is not really pro-life per se. However, it is an excellent reminder of what we’re fighting for and why it’s worth the fight, and plus it’s presented by a mathematician. 😀

Source: http://www.ted.com/talks/alexander_tsiaras_conception_to_birth_visualized.html

Signs of Life

by Kate Larson

I recently went on a road trip to Saskatoon, crossing into the US at Sault-Ste-Marie, and passing through Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota, before crossing into Manitoba and going on to Saskatchewan. In several of the places I passed through, in both the US and Canada, I saw something that surprised and delighted me. Periodically, at the side of the road and, in one instance, on a billboard, I saw pro-life signs. They said things like “An embryo is a baby too,” “Human life is a gift, protect it” and “Life…a beautiful choice.” The billboard sported a picture of an inquisitive looking baby with the words “I could dream before I was born.” One of the signs was outside of a church, but the others were just there, along the road, where one might usually see signs for tourist attractions, stores or hotels. No one had knocked them down or defaced them; they were just part of the landscape, and that was what struck me most about them.

The aim of the pro-life movement is to work toward making abortion and euthanasia unthinkable. The opposition that students face in getting their pro-life views heard on campus, and the way the media gives scant and often skeptical coverage to pro-life events, could lead one to believe that the pro-life position occupies a miniscule place on the fringes of society. Yet, what is more mainstream than roadside signs? They advertise everything from burgers to candidates to atheism. Some may not be to our liking, and maybe some people feel upset when they see pro-life signs. Others must feel uplifted, as I did. Others still might just ignore the signs because they have seen them a hundred times. My point is not so much the response as the fact that the signs are there. They are part of everyday life and seem to indicate that the pro-life position is more a part of everyday life than we may have been led to believe.

If Everything in the Garden is Sunny – Why Meddle?

by Theresa Stephenson

As I turned another page on my calendar this week, I saw how quickly this summer has slipped away and how swiftly autumn is approaching, and with it another school year at ol’ uOttawa. Throughout the summer, the team of uOttawa Students for Life has been in correspondence about plans for the coming year. To be honest, I wish I could say that I only looked at this year with excitement –another year to turn our campus upside down! To spread the wonderful pro-life message to anyone and everyone! To stand up for something and be heard!

But I’m ashamed to admit that that isn’t what I feel. I’m scared. I’m scared of the hostility that we will face. I’m scared of being ostracized. I’m scared of the pain that I’ll see. There are no two ways about it: abortion is uncomfortable. It’s touchy and it’s a sure fire way to get your peers upset.

There are times when I don’t understand why I’m in this group. Sure, I’ve made great friends in this club these past two years that I’ve been at uOttawa. Oftentimes though I wish I could be that stranger who sheepishly scurries past the club’s table and, maybe, timidly gives a thumbs-up and keeps walking. Why didn’t I join water polo?

But the thing is, it isn’t about me. It’s bigger than me and my own comfort zone. I’ll tell you right now, if this was about me I’d stay at home and read a good book.

This summer I was introduced to a new television series called Downtown Abbey based in 1912-1914 in England. A secondary storyline follows the youngest of three daughters who is avidly interested in the political movement of women’s suffrage. Certainly it is a noble cause, but when her father questions why she always finds such gloomy causes, she replies, “Because it’s the gloomy things that need our help. If everything in the garden is sunny – why meddle?”

And that’s why I don’t despair of our “gloomy cause.” It’s precisely what I need to be doing, no matter how uncomfortable I am or how desperately I want to give up because everything is not sunny in the garden. No, 300 babies are killed by abortion daily in Canada. Women are being sold a lie under the pretence of “women’s rights,” but instead of the freedom and liberty that they are promised they find only pain and sorrow.

Because of all this, I might not look to this school year with excitement. Instead, I look forward with trepidation at a long and laborious struggle to the day when abortion will be unthinkable.

Life is Wonderful

by Kate Larson

 As Christmas approaches, many people will make time to watch It’s a Wonderful Life at least once. Having seen it again recently myself, I was struck by some parallels between the pro-life movement and George’s story.

First, here is a brief synopsis for those unfamiliar with the movie. (Those who have been eagerly anticipating seeing it again since the credits rolled last year are invited to skip to the next paragraph.) George Bailey has big dreams. He wants to travel the world and then become a great architect. Every time he’s about to leave Bedford Falls, however, something comes up that requires him to choose between what he ought to do and what he saw himself doing. He ends up taking over the family business, providing loans to ordinary working people who would otherwise be swindled by the town mogul, Henry Potter. Thanks to him, his neighbours start successful businesses and own their own homes. Time and again he stands up to consummate businessman Potter, and just manages to keep operating. Then, thanks to his uncle and business partner accidently misplacing $8,000 that was meant for the business’s otherwise empty bank account, George faces the closure of his business and a prison sentence. There seems to be no solution and, in despair, he considers drowning himself. Fortunately, his family prays for him and an angel, Clarence, is sent to earth to convince him of the value of his life. Clarence shows George what the world would have been like if he had never been born and thus enables him to appreciate what he has and to see that his integrity has been rewarded. Rather than not achieving his dreams, he has achieved them in a more profound and fulfilling way than he could have envisioned.

I see three parallels between George’s experience and the pro-life movement. The first is that we too have a big dream, one of the biggest anyone could have, to render abortion and euthanasia unthinkable. It is so big that it may take more than your or my lifetime to achieve it. We may carry on, standing up for life at every opportunity, but feel that the world around us hasn’t changed. Yet we don’t know how our actions affect others. Aside from loaning the residents of Bedford Falls the money to have houses and businesses, George did three vital things. He saved his brother’s life, he prevented a child’s death by pointing out a mistake made by his first boss, Mr. Gower, and he married and had children. Yet, when he was shown what life would’ve been like without him, he was shocked to see that his brother had died, that Mr. Gower was homeless after serving twenty years in prison, that his wife had never married and that his children did not exist. He measured his actions against his dreams and was, therefore, blind to their good. Just because we have not achieved our big dream does not mean we are not getting there. When we are protesting, it is easier to hear the insults shouted at us than to see the person who takes quiet note of our signs. Meanwhile, that person’s life could have been profoundly affected and they could, in turn, profoundly affect, even save, the life of someone else. We may not always be able to see it, but that does not mean that change is not being wrought and that that change may not be deeper and last longer than we could imagine.

The second parallel is that it is not easy fighting for our cause. Like George, we are the underdogs. Henry Potter is the pro-choice status quo of our university campuses and our society-at-large. He believes that there are no vulnerable people, only problems. He proposes solutions that seem reasonable but are cruel. He seems to be helpful, but only hurts. No, being pro-life is not easy, but nothing of such importance can be.

This brings us to the third parallel. Like George, we in the pro-life movement can get discouraged to the point where we consider stopping our work. At the moment, some campus pro-life clubs are having to go to court for the right to exist. Talks are being shouted down and protests prevented. We may seem to be, as George seemed to be, in an untenable position. Fortunately, we already know two major things that George learned, that life is wonderful and that everyone should have the chance to be born and contribute to their world. When Clarence was fighting to save George’s life, it seemed at first like a losing battle. However, he didn’t give up and neither should we.