Tag Archives: by Elizabeth

Down Syndrome and Abortion

by Elizabeth Tanguay

The latest fad these days in obstetrics is the Integrated Prenatal Screening test (IPS). Doctors may offer this screening, a combination of blood tests and nuchal translucency ultrasound, for neural tube defects and chromosomal anomalies to pregnant women over the age of 35. These tests can detect the probability of the fetus having spina bifida or Down syndrome. If the chance is greater than 1/200, the screen is considered positive and the parents are then offered further testing, such as chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis, which carry a small risk to the fetus. After this, if the fetus is deemed to have Down syndrome, or trisomy 18 or trisomy 13, the obstetrician will offer the parents the option to terminate the pregnancy. There is no real prenatal cure or treatment for Down syndrome, or trisomy 18 or trisomy 13 or spina bifida, except perhaps later in the pregnancy and in utero, which wouldn’t cure the problem, but would perhaps treat some of the heart, nerve and other organ defects. The reason obstetricians and family doctors offer this treatment so early is to give the parents a chance to abort.

Isn’t it strange, that in this post-Nazi, post-World War II age, in times when we have equal opportunity employers, disability benefits, special parking places for people with a disability, the Special Olympics and the Paralympics, that 90% of children with Down syndrome are aborted? Our modern, tolerant society that says that people with a disability are gifts to society would rather kill them than allow them to be born. This is a classic example of modern eugenics at work, as well as the consumer society we live in. We need to understand that children are not products to be consumed, items to purchase, the latest “thing” you must have: they are gifts, loaned to us for a short time to bring joy, laughter, simplicity, and wonder to the world.

But why would we want to rid the world of children with Down syndrome? The number of people who know a person with Down syndrome is decreasing, but those of us who know them can attest to their gentleness, sensitivity, friendliness, and their genuine love for other people. Parents of these children say that the whole family learns so much more from this child with a disability than they could ever imagine. A lesson we all need to learn is that those with genetic differences have just as much of a right to experience life, love and happiness as anyone else.

Check out these excellent articles written by Canadian parents of children who have Down Syndrome:
There’s no such thing as the perfect child
Our daughter’s Down syndrome has taken us on a beautiful journey
Adoption of children with Down syndrome is also increasingly popular: A demand for Down’s
Another great, touching article by the father of a man who has Down Syndrome.

Welcome back!

by Elizabeth Tanguay

Welcome back for a new school year! We are excited to start a new semester at the University of Ottawa with uOSFL.

We had a good start to the fall semester last week at the 101 Week clubs fair. We had managed to find fetal development models, which were very successful in attracting many people to come and discuss life issues. We had several students involved in polite and intellectual discussion about abortion and the question, “When does life begin?” Prior to this, we helped medical students get their first table up and running at the med students clubs fair. Please check us out on Facebook for more pictures of our first week back!

Why are you pro-life?

by Elizabeth Tanguay

In the federal election debates, no one even so much as mentioned the word “abortion.” And Harper has explicitly said that he will oppose any motion or bill that reopens the abortion debate. However, this does not mean that there is no point in voting pro-life. It is important to ensure the rights of unborn children and the rights of pregnant women are respected and protected in this county. For more information on elections and pro-life issues, see Campaign Life Coalition’s election page.

Live Action recently asked on their Facebook page, “In ten words or less, why are you pro-life?” Here are the highlights of some of the responses they got.  My personal favourite: “As a former fetus, I oppose abortion.”

May we never forget our most humble roots and continue to stand up for the thousands and millions of unborn children, our human brothers and sisters, who lose their lives to abortion.

Remember why you are pro-life. Vote on May 2, 2011.

Save Baby Joseph!

by Elizabeth Tanguay

Joseph Maraachli is a one-year-old baby who depends on a ventilator to live. He is dying of an undiagnosed neurodegenerative disorder. His parents, who lost a previous child to a similar disease, want the doctors to perform a tracheotomy, like they did for their daughter, to enable them to care for their dying son at home. The hospital refused and has instead tried to force the parents to consent to removing the ventilator. The family has fought back courageously, and right now they are trying to get baby Joseph transferred to another hospital where he will get the treatment he needs.

As a nursing student, it seems to me that the parents shouldn’t have to fight to try and provide comfort care for their baby so he can die with them at home. The doctor said that the tracheotomy would be risky and that Joseph would suffer; however, in front of the tribunal, the doctor stated that Joseph couldn’t feel pain and was in a permanent vegetative state; he didn’t respond to stimuli. However, as this video shows, Joseph is not vegetative, as he is moving to his parents’ stimuli. I can’t help asking myself: what is the hidden agenda here? Why can’t the relatively simple and humane request of the parents be granted? They are, after all, the first decision-makers for treatment for this baby. While I don’t have all the medical facts of the case, as a sister, if my little brother were dying and there was nothing more the hospital could do for him, and there was a way to make him comfortable at home, I would want that. The Maraachlis aren’t asking for a miracle: they are asking for good palliative care. If you are interested in supporting the Maraachlis as they go through this ordeal, please join the “Save Baby Joseph” Facebook group or go to any of the articles linked to here and scroll down to see how you can help.

Follow the rest of story here, here and here.

Happy New Year from uOSFL!

by Elizabeth Tanguay

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to all readers!

For those of you who voted for the Pregnancy Care Centre of Kamloops, BC,
for Joey’s Community Revival Project, you will be pleased to know that
they won the $25,000 prize with 2015 votes! (See this post and this website.) Congratulations to the Kamloops Pregnancy Care Centre!

The winner of Action Life’s video contest can be found here.
It’s a very powerful video and very well done. I highly recommend it.

Also, as a resource for Anastasia’s post below, I recommend
consulting this website and this one for information on vaccines.

Happy viewing and reading!

Adoption Awareness Month

by Elizabeth Tanguay

I’m very excited about November being Adoption Awareness Month because as a pro-life group, we talk about choosing life instead of abortion, but we don’t typically talk as much about adoption specifically. Just the other day, I found a great new site: adoptionincanada.ca There is information about how adoption works and testimonials of mothers who have placed their babies for adoption. Even in my own community, I know several people who were adopted and are very grateful to their birth mothers for the gift of life and a loving family. Adoption is not easy, but it’s a choice that both mom and baby can live with.

Stem Cell Research

by Elizabeth Tanguay

I’ve been wanting to write on this for a while now, but there never was an appropriate time. Now that the courts in the US have halted Obama’s administration from expanding the embryonic stem cell research program, I think the time has come.

A stem cell is your basic cell, with the amazing property to develop into any kind of tissue. This is why we originally started using embryos, because they are developing all their tissues, and therefore have lots of stem cells. But what we are discovering now is that we also have stem cells scattered a little all over the place in our body. One valuable source of stem cells is umbilical cord blood.

Embryonic stem cell research was first viewed as the miracle cure for all kinds of diseases, such as Parkinson’s and cancer. But the promise of this research has not yielded a single cure. Embryonic stem cells are too unstable, and they can cause tumours. There is also a greater risk of it being rejected by the recipient’s body. It’s mostly politicians who are trying to put more money into it.

 However, adult stem cells, which doesn’t require the destruction of a human life, have saved hundreds of lives and been found to cure sickle cell anemia, systemic scleroderma, and quadriplegia, just to name a few.

Also, it makes more scientific sense than embryonic stem cells. As they say, there is no controversy in taking cells from your own body. There are stem cells found everywhere in your tissues. No need to worry about tissue rejection or tumours from fast growing cells. And the list of the conditions they treat is staggering.  Everything from cancers to autoimmune diseases to some neural degenerative disorders have been successfully treated or cured with adult stem cells, often taken from the patient’s own body.

This is clearly an area where political agendas are getting the way of scientific advancement. Up to last year, embryonic stem cell research in the US wasn’t getting any funding from the government. But now the Obama administration have lifted that ban and given millions to fund something that doesn’t even work.

Survivors!

by Elizabeth Tanguay

Recently, the famous blind Italian musician Andrea Bocelli revealed that he was almost aborted. Fortunately for the music world and for his fans, he was not.

Here is a beautiful clip of him playing the piano and telling his story. (It’s in Italian but there are subtitles):

This is what he shared with the audience in the video:

“A young pregnant wife has been hospitalized for a simple attack of appendicitis. The doctors had to apply some ice on her stomach, and when the treatments ended, the doctors suggested she abort the child. They told her it was the best solution because the baby would be born with some disability. But the young brave wife decided not to abort and the child was born. That woman was my mother, and I was the child.

Maybe I’m partisan, but I can say it was the right choice. And I hope this could encourage many mothers that sometimes find themselves in difficult situations, in those moments when life is complicated, but want to save the life of their baby.”

Hey, maybe I’m partisan too, but I know of two young people in my church who are adopted. Their birth mother could have aborted them too, but she gave them life. And I can say that this brother and sister are also very glad that their mother made that choice.

We are all survivors of the abortion holocaust. Our mothers chose life. And I think they made the right choice too. To see more stories like this, please visit www.IAmWholeLife.org.

A note from uOSFL: While it would certainly be a loss to the music community to lose Mr. Bocelli, we must remember that every aborted child never has the chance to be missed. Whether they might have grown up to be prodigies of some sort, of just to be regular people, they are missing. And the number of missing children is frightening because when we grieve them, we don’t even know what we miss.