Tag Archives: NCLN

Urgent: Speak Up for M408!

See We Need A Law for background, links and their action items.

From NCLN:

Motion 408 Needs YOU!

M408-pmharper

 

Mark Warawa’s Motion 408 has been deemed non-votable, even though it met all the criteria for votability, as the impartial analyst from the Library of Parliament repeatedly said. This decision was “shocking and undemocratic” and will be appealed. But your help is urgently needed!

As you slave away on your computer, finishing up those final term assignments, take a break to Tweet and e-mail Prime Minister Harper and the committee members who will be involved with this appeal. Encourage your friends to do likewise!

Our politicians NEED to hear an OUTCRY from the public.

PM Harper can be contacted via:
Email: pm@pm.gc.ca
Twitter: @pmharper
Phone: 613-992-4211

Here are the committee members who will hear Mark Warawa’s appeal!
@CraigScottNDP
@nathancullen
@NycoleTurmelNPD
@Armstrong_MP
@ParmGill
@TomLukiwski
@CostasMenegakis
@ScottReidCPC

Every time you Tweet about this, be sure to include @pmharper and hashtag #M408 !

Give those thumbs some extra exercise and Tweet Tweet Tweet!

E-mail these committee members who deemed Motion 408 non-votable:

Dave MacKenzie – dave.mackenzie@parl.gc.ca
Scott Armstrong – scott.armstrong@parl.gc.ca
Stephane Dion – stephane.dion@parl.gc.ca
Philip Toone – philip.toone@parl.gc.ca

Remember that this is not about voting for #M408, but about deeming the motion VOTABLE so that it can be debated in the House of Commons.

Can’t think of a Tweet to Tweet? Here’s some examples:

@pmharper Listen to the 92%! #M408 should be deemed votable!

The library of parliament analyst said #M408 passed the criteria. Will you respect procedure? Allow M408 to go to the House! @pmharper

Canada needs to condemn ALL discrimination against women! @pmharper Allow #M408 to be debated!

92% of Canadians want to see sex-selective abortion banned. Why is the debate being banned? Where’s the democracy? @pmharper? #M408

Disappointed with @armstrong_MP for ignoring the need to protect women with #M408! @pmharper

@ParmGill Be a voice for Canadian women and support the vote for #M408 @pmharper

Support #M408! @TomLukiwski @CostasMenegakis @ScottReidCPC @ParmGill @Armstrong_MP @NycoleTurmelNDP @nathancullen @CraigScottNDP

Be sure to Tweet @MPMarkWarawa to show him your support and encouragement!

Don’t forget to follow NCLN on Twitter to stay updated!

@NCLN
@NCLNwestern
@RebeccaFaustina
@Clarlulu
@Kathleen_Dunn

“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.” – Martin Luther King Jr.

In addition, Carleton University is hosting a screening of the award-winning documentary It’s A Girl this Thursday. See the Facebook event for more details and attend to learn more about this international and deadly form of discrimination.

DefendGirls

by Kate

DefendGirls is a new campaign to provide information and raise awareness about sex-selective abortion. I recommend taking a look at the DefendGirls Facebook page or at the website defendgirls.ca. The site offers information about the issue and about Motion 408, the motion recently filed in the House of Commons asking parliamentarians to condemn sex-selective abortions as discrimination against girls. The site also provides suggestions and links for further action and has a very interesting blog. DefendGirls stickers, postcards, business cards and t-shirts can be purchased through the NCLN website.

DefendGirls

 

Call to Action on Assisted Suicide

From NCLN:

Action Needed: BC Court Strikes Down Assisted-Suicide Ban

On Friday June 15th, the B.C. Supreme Court passed judgment on the Carter v. Canada Case. As Will Johnston, Chair of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition of B.C., stated in a National Post opinion piece, the decision “purports to create constitutional immunity for those who provide assistance to those seeking to kill themselves — a judgment that stands at odds with the Supreme Court of Canada’s Rodriguez ruling in 1993. …. Current law will stand for at least a year (the sole exception being the plaintiff in this case, 64-year-old ALS patient Gloria Taylor)”.

Allowing euthanasia and assisted suicide in our country directly threatens the lives of people with disabilities as well other vulnerable people in our society, and opens up further avenues for elder abuse.

A recent press release from the Canadian Association for Community Living concerning the Carter case decision stated, “Our concern, therefore, is that rather than advancing equality rights for Canadians with disabilities, this ruling will have quite the opposite effect. We fear that by embedding in Canadian law the message that some forms of human life are less worth living, the historic disadvantages faced by Canadians with disabilities that the equality rights provisions of the Canadian Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms were to address, will only be more deeply entrenched.”

We need you to raise awareness about the harms of legalized euthanasia and assisted suicide:
Sign this petition to the Attorney General of Canada, requesting that he adopts the strongest possible opposition to the legalization of assisted suicide and euthanasia
Read these talking points provided by the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition, and send letters to your local media outlets outlining your opposition to the court’s ruling as it is a recipe for elder abuse, and creates a slippery slope which discriminates against people with disabilities and leaves them at risk
Contact the Justice Minister, the Honourable Robert Nicholson, asking him to stay the Carter decision and appeal it to the BC Court of Appeal
Become educated on this issue by checking out some of these articles and resources.

We hope you will do all you can to make your voice known in this matter. Our society has ultimately failed if our solution to problems is to eliminate the sufferer, rather than find measures to alleviate their suffering.

“What does it mean to give informed consent to one’s own death?
Is it meaningful to say that we can appreciate and understand the nature and consequences of that decision, when that decision means that we will no longer be here?
Isn’t autonomy about the right to non-interference, in the name of protecting one’s integrity, not undermining it?
Doesn’t the right to self-determination only find meaning because we wish to lay claim to our future?”
~Michael Bach, Executive Vice-President,
Canadian Association for Community Living

Also, check out the personal, thought-provoking piece by NCLN’s Executive Director, a uOSFL alumnus.

National March for Life: May 10, 2012

Be there:

If you would like to march with us, we will be meeting at noon on Parliament Hill on the right lawn (in front of East Block) by the Centennial flame. Watch for our big banner!

The full schedule of events is available here.

Also, hurry up and buy your tickets for the NCLN dinner.

And for budding videographers:

Choosing Love on Valentine’s Day

Head on over to NCLN for a great post on Valentine’s Day by uOSFL alumnus Rebecca Richmond!

Love wants the highest good for the other person. As such, love is not self-serving, but is oriented towards the other. It is more than a onetime proclamation or commitment, but rather is revealed in our daily actions as we serve others.

Breaking Through: The 2011 NCLN Symposium

Re-posted from www.ncln.ca

Promoting the pro-life message on university campuses is not an easy task. There are many obstacles and barriers to contend with, both in the classroom and out. Discrimination, censorship, and controversy are issues but even more problematic is the student body’s apathetic attitude.

Breaking Through: The 2011 Symposium equips students like you to break through these obstacles on your campuses. The Symposium is much more than a conference. This annual gathering of pro-life student leaders from across Canada is a weekend of learning, networking, sharing, and laughing; a potent combination of taking in the knowledge of experts in the Pro-Life Movement and learning practical skills and strategies in order to have an impact on campus.

If you’re a student involved with a campus club or someone who’s interested in getting involved on campus, the Symposium is for you!

The symposium is Sept. 30 to Oct. 2 in Toronto. For more information, check it out on the NCLN blog or the Facebook event.

Join uOSFL at the March for Life and NCLN Dinner!

Join your favourite pro-life student club at the March for Life! We will be congregating on Parliament Hill betweenа noon and 1 pm. You will be able to recognize us by our enormous banner. The March itself begins at 1:30 pm and lasts for about an hour. For more information on the March and related events, see the official page.

Later that day, at 6 pm, there is Life & Justice: The 3rd Annual Campus Pro-Life Student Dinner, organised by the National Campus Life Network. It is an opportunity for students (and some of their non-student allies) to come together for an evening of food and fellowship as we celebrate the accomplishments of campus pro-life groups and look to the upcoming school year.  The evening will feature student testimonials as well as a review of the student pro-life movement in Canada over the past year, and also a delicious buffet!

It will take place in the hall of St. Theresa Catholic Church at 95 Somerset St. W. (St. Theresa’s is in the downtown and only a 20 minute walk from Parliament Hill). Tickets are $20 for students and $30 for non-students; if you would like a ticket, you can contact Rebecca at director@ncln.ca.

Click here to see the official poster. We hope to see you all there!

What’s Wrong With an Emotional Response?

by Kate Larson

The October 4th arrest of students at Carleton University about to take part in the Genocide Awareness Project (GAP), the display of graphic posters comparing abortion to the Holocaust and similar atrocities, made me think about the use of images in discussions of abortion. At both this year’s and last year’s abortion debates hosted by Ottawa Students for Life, the pro-choice speakers re-iterated the common argument that the use of images of abortion in discussions of the subject is intellectually dishonest and emotionally manipulative. This implies a number of things: firstly that images are being used in place of logical arguments, rather than to enhance them or to promote discussion of them, secondly that words are somehow neutral and have no manipulative power of their own, and lastly that emotions have no place in just decision-making.

            The National Campus Life Network website is just one place where rational arguments against abortion are laid out clearly and compellingly. No images are used to fill logical holes. There are no holes to fill. As for the OSFL debates, full logical justification of the pro-life position was given. A short video was shown of an abortion being performed, and the audience was warned that it might be disturbing and that they were welcome to cover their eyes or turn away if they wished. The video did not substitute for any argument, but only served to remind the audience, if they chose to view it, of the reality of something that is too horrifying for words to adequately convey.

            This brings us to the emotional resonance of words. Words can be carefully chosen to increase or decrease the emotional impact of what a person is saying. They are certainly not mere servants of fact. One has only to consider how abortion is often referred to in society to see that. Terms such as “a woman’s right to choose” or umbrella terms such as “reproductive rights”, “reproductive freedom”, “reproductive choice”, and “body rights” are not factual references, they are names chosen to make the killing of babies sound positive, desirable, and even necessary. It seems to me there can be no intellectual honesty and lack of emotional manipulation in a position that doesn’t even properly name what it attempts to justify.

            Why do we debate issues such as abortion? We do so because we do not live by logic alone. The desire to make just decisions is motivated not by statistics or cost-benefit analysis but by love and compassion for others and hope that our society will be better for everyone if we do what is right and oppose what is wrong. Logical argument is important, but it is this love and compassion and hope that makes us more than automatons and ought to help ensure that we do not blithely allow innocent human beings to be killed. Of course people will have an emotional response to images of abortion: the images are awful. They are also real and no amount of rhetoric is going to make them seem positive, desirable, or necessary.

Oh, Toronto!

by Rebecca Richmond

[A note from uOSFL: Many people think of university as a time to do ‘crazy things’ that we give up when we become ‘serious adults’. While we hope that she is beyond all-nighters, cramming, and living on ramen noodles, our former President Rebecca Richmond , who has recently begun in her new job as Director of National Campus Life Network, is a testimony to the fact that activism doesn’t end when you receive your diploma!]

No, I will not be a Torontonian or “from Toronto.”  I will simply be a girl from the Ottawa Valley who happens to live in Toronto.

I always vowed that I would never live in Toronto, and I can’t believe that I’ll be moving there next weekend.  But, since the beginning of my involvement with the Campus Pro-Life Movement, you wouldn’t believe all the things I can’t believe I end up doing!

It’s not easy to be a campus pro-life leader.  There is so much to be done, but so little time with all the other commitments you have to juggle as a student.  Fortunately, we’re not alone.  UOttawa Students For Life has benefited so much from the help and support of National Campus Life Network (NCLN).  NCLN is the only national organization that exists to educate, support and network pro-life post-secondary students across Canada.   NCLN has trained us to be more effective as club leaders and as pro-life advocates.  They’ve provided us with effective resources designed for university campuses.  They’ve connected us with other pro-life groups, including other campus groups as well as community and national groups. They’ve given us advice and encouragement, helping us to set goals and carry out our plans.  NCLN made club pro-life advocacy more manageable, maximizing our effectiveness and minimizing the burden of additional work.

During my time with uOSFL, I repeatedly said, “I want to do this full-time!”  Now, I have that opportunity.  I am very excited to be working full-time with NCLN, now that I’ve graduated from my studies at uOttawa.   It is an incredible honour and privilege to be able to support campus pro-life clubs in Canada.

I will miss Ottawa terribly but I know that the sacrifice of moving away from Ottawa and the Ottawa Valley will pale in comparison to the joys of working with NCLN.

Being pro-life at uOttawa

by Theresa Stephenson

This is my speech from the National Campus Life Network dinner that followed the March for Life, regarding my experience in leadership and pro-life activism on the uOttawa campus.

~ ~ ~

A few days ago I met up with a friend of mine for a chat over a cup of coffee. Our opinions tend to differ on every possible subject and topic. When he asked me how I enjoyed my first year at uOttawa I told him all about the pro-life club – its members, activities, events – and about the amazing things I had learned from my involvement over the past year.

His reply to me was “Theresa, I understand your opinions on these issues. I know you’re pro-life and you can make valid arguments. You’re a rational and intelligent person, but I could name a hundred things that are more worthwhile to protest than abortion.”

He couldn’t be more wrong.

When life and death is in the balance, nothing could be more important. Every year, almost 100,000 beating hearts are stopped by abortion in Canada. Women are being brutally battered, physically and psychologically hurt by these procedures in clinics and hospitals. Families are being shattered. And all of this is permissible by law. All of this is considered the status quo. These issues are the most important to be fighting against.

It’s not easy being pro-life. We’re certainly not the cool kids on campus. At best, our peers might put up with us if we’re fairly quiet about our radical opinions. At worst, our freedom of expression is denied and our voices are silenced. All this makes our work that much harder.

We’re standing up for each person’s right to life while most people ignore it. We’re standing up against injustices and that goes against the grain. It’s a hard thing to do, and I know there are times when I feel overwhelmed by the unfathomable daily loss of human life.

But the dark clouds part and the shadows are dispelled when the truth touches the heart of even one person. Last September, I met a remarkable young woman who has become a very close friend. She was pro-choice. After a couple of months and many conversations, I saw her heart change. She is now actively pro-life. Seeing this one mind change is truly encouraging. Seeing this one person bravely embark in the new territory of pro-life activism is inspiring. One such transformation is the perfect antidote to discouragement.

This past year, I made some incredible friends in the club. The strength and camaraderie in the group inspires me to keep fighting and working. And not only the members of uOttawa Students for Life, but tonight as we gather from various campuses we remain united in the goal to make abortion unthinkable.