Tag Archives: statistics

Abortion By The Numbers in Canada

The National Post recently published a very informative and sobering infographic that breaks down the number of abortions that happened in Canada in 2009 by province and age of mother and child. (Note that the data underestimates the number of abortions because they’re not all reported.) What will you do to help decrease the number of preventable deaths where you live?

On a similar note, it was recently reported that 491 babies were born alive and left to die following botched abortions in Canada from 2000 to 2009. Have you emailed your MP?

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1 in 4 Preborn Children Aborted


by Nicole Pachla

What a terrifying statistic. These words speak for themselves: 1 in 4 preborn children is aborted. What is happening to our nation?! A quarter of our generation has vanished and the next will continue to disappear if things do not change. Abortion is often seen as the default response to an unintended pregnancy and the consequences are deadly.

These preborn children are human beings, from the moment of conception, and they have the right to life just as much as you and I do. Give it a little thought. Those babies were not even given one single chance at life. Is that fair? Is this how a society should function?

Of course, there is no ideal society, but our society should at least strive to protect its weaker members, those who have no voice of their own, instead of mercilessly killing them.

Stand up and speak out for life because this statistic needs to change!

Down Syndrome and Abortion

by Elizabeth Tanguay

The latest fad these days in obstetrics is the Integrated Prenatal Screening test (IPS). Doctors may offer this screening, a combination of blood tests and nuchal translucency ultrasound, for neural tube defects and chromosomal anomalies to pregnant women over the age of 35. These tests can detect the probability of the fetus having spina bifida or Down syndrome. If the chance is greater than 1/200, the screen is considered positive and the parents are then offered further testing, such as chorionic villus sampling and amniocentesis, which carry a small risk to the fetus. After this, if the fetus is deemed to have Down syndrome, or trisomy 18 or trisomy 13, the obstetrician will offer the parents the option to terminate the pregnancy. There is no real prenatal cure or treatment for Down syndrome, or trisomy 18 or trisomy 13 or spina bifida, except perhaps later in the pregnancy and in utero, which wouldn’t cure the problem, but would perhaps treat some of the heart, nerve and other organ defects. The reason obstetricians and family doctors offer this treatment so early is to give the parents a chance to abort.

Isn’t it strange, that in this post-Nazi, post-World War II age, in times when we have equal opportunity employers, disability benefits, special parking places for people with a disability, the Special Olympics and the Paralympics, that 90% of children with Down syndrome are aborted? Our modern, tolerant society that says that people with a disability are gifts to society would rather kill them than allow them to be born. This is a classic example of modern eugenics at work, as well as the consumer society we live in. We need to understand that children are not products to be consumed, items to purchase, the latest “thing” you must have: they are gifts, loaned to us for a short time to bring joy, laughter, simplicity, and wonder to the world.

But why would we want to rid the world of children with Down syndrome? The number of people who know a person with Down syndrome is decreasing, but those of us who know them can attest to their gentleness, sensitivity, friendliness, and their genuine love for other people. Parents of these children say that the whole family learns so much more from this child with a disability than they could ever imagine. A lesson we all need to learn is that those with genetic differences have just as much of a right to experience life, love and happiness as anyone else.

Check out these excellent articles written by Canadian parents of children who have Down Syndrome:
There’s no such thing as the perfect child
Our daughter’s Down syndrome has taken us on a beautiful journey
Adoption of children with Down syndrome is also increasingly popular: A demand for Down’s
Another great, touching article by the father of a man who has Down Syndrome.