Tag Archives: uOttawa

Chalking on Campus

A few weeks ago, members of uOttawa Students for Life did some chalking around campus, helping to bring messages of truth and of love for preborn children and their mothers to our fellow students.

Flags on the Hill

IMG_20141002_080245This morning, members of uOttawa Students for Life joined almost one hundred other volunteers from We Need A Law to plant 100,000 blue and pink flags on Parliament Hill. Each of these flags represents one of the 100,000 children killed by abortion in Canada every year since the Morgentaler decision in 1988.

The children represented by these flags were not much loved in life, and have rarely been remembered in death, except perhaps by their mothers and fathers, many of whom grieve by the loss of their children to abortion. But for most of us, these children’s lives ended so soon after they began that their deaths passed us by unnoticed and largely uncared for. 

Today we took a stand to remember these children and to witness to the injustice committed against them. These children will never laugh or cry. They were never read a book or watch a play. They will never see a sunset. And they will never feel the embrace of the one they love. They were killed before any of that. They are victims of our individualist and consumer culture, as are their parents. But they will not go unremembered, at least not while we have anything to say about it.

Because we are pro-life. We want the unwanted. We defend the defenceless. And we witness to the beauty, the power, and the meaning of every single human life from conception till natural death.

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Female Feticide

From Aborting Women’s Rights:

So prevalent is this trend that the delicate balance required to maintain healthy populations is becoming badly skewed. According to an article in The New Atlantis:

“The practice has become so ruthlessly routine in many contemporary societies that it has impacted their very population structures, warping the balance between male and female births and consequently skewing the sex ratios for the rising generation toward a biologically unnatural excess of males. This still-growing international predilection for sex-selective abortion is by now evident in the demographic contours of dozens of countries around the globe – and it is sufficiently severe that it has come to alter the overall sex ratio at birth of the entire planet, resulting in millions upon millions of new ‘missing baby girls’ each year. In terms of its sheer toll in human numbers, sex-selective abortion has assumed a scale tantamount to a global war against baby girls.”

When feminists talk about abortion, they do so in terms of women’s rights. Legalized abortion empowers women, they assert, because it puts them in control over their bodies; it gives them the choice whether or not to bear a child who has been conceived. What these proponents of “liberty” fail to consider, however, is that in many cases women are “choosing” abortion at the behest of someone else. Cultural pressures, fear of retaliation, and other factors are driving them to end the lives of their unborn children because daughters are deemed undesirable. Thus, abortion is being used as an instrument of oppression against females, not as a tool of liberation.

No doubt abortion advocates would argue that it is not abortion that is at fault here, but backward cultures that are misusing the tools of liberty in order to further their misogynistic agendas. Third world abortion might be an abusive, repugnant phenomenon, but that says nothing about its use in the western world. Such logic is nothing short of delusional. When it comes to questions of life and death, there is little gray area. You are either an advocate of life, a supporter of inherent human dignity, or you aren’t. You can’t justify the killing of the unborn the name “choice” and then complain when others exercise that choice in ways you find objectionable.

So this leaves the feminists of the west in somewhat of a pickle. What will they make of these new demographic trends? Will they stick to their guns and defend the use of abortion even as a tool of gender-based infanticide? Will they attempt to somehow construct a “morality of abortion” in which only certain motivations for the procedure are deemed justifiable? Will they evade the issue altogether?

For the sake of millions of unborn women around the world, here’s hoping this trend puts some pressure the pro-abortion movement to reconsider the implications of their inhuman and inhumane conception of human “rights.”

End of Life or Ending Life?

Check out this article on assisted suicide in the University of Ottawa’s English-language student newspaper, The Fulcrum: http://thefulcrum.ca/2011/11/assisting-the-suicidal/

Assisted suicide conveys a brutal message as to who our society really cares about. It tells the elderly, the weak, and those in pain that we are unwilling to foster their well being. Instead, we propose an easy alternative: Death. Easy for the rest of us, at least.

Up for Debate

Thank you to all those who came to the debate and who helped make it happen. For those of you who weren’t able to attend, watch it here:

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(For more footage of past uOSFL events, see our Videos page.)

See also a recap of the debate, a few photos and a list of debate decliners, courtesy of ProWomanProLife, as well as another take on the Canadian Physicians for Life Students blog.

Lecture: Being an Ethical Physician on Abortion

When: Thursday, September 29th, 2011, 1:30pm-2:30pm
Where: UofO, Roger Guidon Hall (RGN), Room 2035, 451 Smyth Rd.
Info: There are approximately 100,000 abortion procedures annually in Canada. Should more physicians be doing abortions? Referring for them? Or not? Patients may request abortion for a variety of reasons from rape, to fetal anomalies, to socio-economic concerns. What should be the response of an ethical physician? Come to this presentation followed by Q & A.
Presentation by Stephanie Gray of the Canadian Centre for Bio-Ethical Reform.

Event hosted by Ottawa Medical Students for Life.

Look… babies!

by Theresa Stephenson

This past month has been a busy one as everyone is settling into the routine of a new school year and the campus has been humming with activity. First during 101 week and then during clubs’ week, uOSFL set up an info table for the club. A new feature this year: Action Life generously shared with us their fetal models, which track the development of the preborn baby from the first to the seventh month of pregnancy. I was so surprised by the reactions they prompted!

Usually I watch people scurry past our table, in no mood to have a conversation with the “old-fashioned-anti-choice-we-hate-women-and-we’re-also-religious-nuts-who-despise-logic” club. But this year I saw genuine curiosity as people approached the table, tempted to look more closely at the models and ask us what our club was all about. Now, some were a little disappointed that we weren’t the obstetrics club, but for the most part I had the opportunity to have many great conversations with people who would normally never even think about the topic of abortion. Time after time, I heard the same reaction when I asked, “What do you think about abortion?” Time after time, I felt like I was having, at root, incredibly similar conversations, as students presented the same questions and concerns and thoughts.

I really found it fascinating to hear different arguments from different people, but each one came down to the same basic question – what is the preborn? A number of times I heard people talking about our table from a few feet away. Some people didn’t approach the table, but one pair of students in particular seemed to answer the question quite succinctly when one girl pointed to the fetal models and turned to her friend saying, “Look…babies!”

Exactly. Babies. And what does abortion do to babies? It intentionally kills them.

As I was speaking with one young man and we delved further into the topic of abortion he said to me, “Your points are logical and consistent. You’re making me sound so hypocritical.” Now I don’t know if anyone walked away those days with their mind changed. But I do hope that the conversations that they engaged in have given them something to think about because this debate is not over.