Tag Archives: women’s rights

The 10 lies we tell (supposedly)

by Elizabeth Tanguay

As I was trying to find the uOSFL group on Parliament Hill while at the March for Life, pro-choicers were handing out pamphlets entitled, “10 Lies that Anti-Choice groups are telling you about abortion.” I kept it because I figured it needs to be refuted. Eventually I plan to write a rebuttal and send it back to them (studies and all), but for now here it is as some “food for thought”.

Here is the pamphlet from the Abortion Rights Coalition of Canada (ARCC).

To contact them about their pamphlet:

info@arcc-cdac.ca

ARCC-CDAC
P.O. Box 2663
Station Main, Vancouver, BC
V6B 3W3

On a completely different note, sign up to support this excellent documentary that is having its premiere in New York this week: Blood Money Film.

“The times they are a-changin’…”

by Eliza Jane Phillis

I’ll be the first to admit that for someone who has lived in Ottawa for four years, attending classes mere minutes away from Parliament Hill, I know very little, and to be perfectly honest, care very little about most of the political process. I vote more out of a sense of obligation toward the strong women of the suffragette movement than anything else, and that’s about it. However, I would really have to have my head in the sand not to have heard about the recent increase in interest in the abortion debate. I don’t really know what the G8 Summit is and only just realized it was happening in my own country this past week; yet, I can’t help but feel grateful for its unexpected side effect. It seems Prime Minister Harper’s has proposed plan of action to combat maternal health tragedies in developing countries which is wonderful and important. Opposition leader Michael Ignatieff’s appears to have pushed for the incorporation of access to abortion in this commendable initiative, and the Prime Minister said no. However, the discussions didn’t end there and the proposal and its opposition have really stirred the pot on the abortion debate. It seems Mr. Ignatieff, in trying to insinuate abortion into a proposal in which it has no place, has achieved what pro-lifers have been trying to do for years with minimal success: bring the abortion debate back to the public’s attention.

Listlessly flipping through a bus station newspaper yesterday waiting for my 96 downtown, I came across no less than three articles concerning abortion. One of these actually showcased the situation of University of Calgary students who are facing expulsion for participating in a controversial pro-life display. I was shocked! I’ve participated in a national March for Life which (legally) shut down whole streets in the capital city and seen no mention of it in the paper the next day. This type of exposure over a debate which the powers that be would like us to believe is closed and old news only demonstrates that the exact opposite is true. Yes, most of the articles had to do with the pro-choice side, but they still hopefully made my fellow readers think about where they stand in the debate which we pro-lifers know never really ended, but which many people on the street would likely rather ignore. This is an opportunity for us to explain our well-reasoned positions on life issues. This could be the unexpected spark which ignites a change in the hearts of those like myself who know little about politics but instead vote according to my personal moral convictions. I challenge all pro-life men and women in this time of great potential to take the time to really consider why you are pro-life. We all have our own personal reasons which keep us anchored to an ideal which sometimes seems so counter-cultural, and being able to clearly articulate and express these reasons is how we will change hearts one person at a time. We can’t all be politicians creating laws to preserve the dignity of life, but we can all explain why we as individuals maintain and promote this ideal. I commend the work of brave pro-life politicians, but I truly feel that politics will not in the end be the solution. Society needs to change, and no laws will bring this about, but individuals having respectful, intelligent, and open conversations have the power to end abortion in this country.

Breaking News: Roxanne’s Law Introduced in Parliament

Bill to Ban Coerced Abortion Introduced into Canadian Parliament

By Daniel Gilman

LifeSiteNews is reporting that today in the House of Commons Member of Parliament Rod Bruinooge tabled Bill C-510, which will be known as Roxanne’s Law. This bill is seeking to stop people from intimidating and pressuring women to have abortions against their will.  This bill recognizes the reality that there are women throughout Canada who are coerced into having abortions. As Mr. Bruinooge clearly stated: “Many women have been forced into unwanted abortions; others have been injured or killed for resisting, like Roxanne Fernando, in whose memory I have named this bill.”

Mr Bruinooge went onto explain, “In early 2007, Roxanne Fernando’s boyfriend attempted to coerce her into having an abortion.  After backing out on the decision to abort her baby, Roxanne’s boyfriend then chose to have her killed.  When someone uses coercion, it can lead to violence.  Roxanne’s Law will communicate to all Canadians that coercing a pregnant woman to have an abortion against her will is unacceptable in a nation that values human rights.”

For further information see LifeSiteNews or continue to check our blog for further updates.

Please consider writing a brief email to Mr. Bruinooge letting him know of your support for this much needed bill: rod@bruinooge.com

Someone had to say it

by Garnet

Here’s an excellent article by Kelly McParland that appeared in today’s National Post that exposes the hypocrisy of pro-choice people objecting to sex-selection-abortion.

In order to support “a woman’s right to choose,” you have to believe that a fetus is not human in the moral sense. This judgment — or lack thereof — is encoded in Canadian law, which permits abortion for any reason, or no reason at all.

If you believe a fetus is not a human life, the fetus becomes no different from any other unwanted appendage on a woman’s body. There is no moral difference to removing it than there is to removing an unwanted mole, or an unsightly wart. It’s just a bunch of flesh, with no human soul or spirit to it, so what’s the difference?

Why, then, would abortion proponents object to women having abortions because they don’t like the sex of the fetus? If a fetus is not human, a woman has the right to abort it for whatever reason she chooses: because she doesn’t feel like going through the process; because it might interfere with her career plans; because she doesn’t like children in general; or because she loves Starbucks and someone told her she’d have to give up caffeine during the pregnancy. What, no latte?

Well said, well said.  Once again, the abortion debate comes down to the humanity of the unborn.

Pro-life and… Feminist?

by Rebecca Richmond

I have a confession to make: I am a flawed human being. The flurry of activity that constituted my Easter weekend flowed into the craziness of paper-writing and, failing to check the blog schedule, I realized only today that I was supposed to have submitted my blog entry last night.

As such, my offering is short and sweet.

I grew up rather angry at feminists. I blamed them (not suffragettes but the feminists of the sexual revolution era) for damaging society. Oddly enough, I now consider myself a feminist, although with an understanding of gender that conflicts with most other feminists out there (I believe in integral complementarity, in case you’re wondering).

There are, as I’m sure you’re aware, pro-life feminists out there. Check out Feminists for Life  and some of their articles: “Women Deserve Better than Abortion” and “The Bitter Price of Choice”. Feminists for Life continues in the tradition of early feminists like Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton who were pro-life.

I’m writing a paper (due tomorrow) for my feminist theories class on maternal feminism (think of the Famous Five and the Persons Case) and new feminism/integral complementarity (think of John Paul II and Edith Stein). It’s interesting stuff, let me assure you. One of the authors I’m reading wrote something I thought I would share with you:

“May will see a betrayal of justice – and assuredly of feminism – in any suggestion that women may bear a special responsibility to nurture the culture of life, which alone can protect our future….No doubt the ideals of service and sacrifice run directly against the grain of our culture, but if we deny their claims we place ourselves at high risk. Until now, feminism in general – and we all know there are marginal exceptions – has waged a fierce battle to permit women to behave like men and, in the areas in which they cannot, to guarantee them the same results as if they had. A new feminism requires that we must the courage and the faith to reverse this paradigm. Women throughout the world are in desperate need of policies that respect and protect them as women – not policies that ensure their access to abortion so that they can become as “free” as men. A feminism grounded in the defense of a women’s right to “choose” to have an abortion is inescapably a feminism that promotes the culture of death. It is never easy to go against the grain, especially when doing so exposes one to social and economic risks. But without the will to defy prevailing ideas, we will condemn ourselves to more of the same….Who knows? If we succeed in defending a culture of life in which personhood is understood as mutual recognition rather than autonomy and no person is ever objectified as the means to an end, men – within the constraints of their differences from us – may follow.”

Excerpt taken from: Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, “Equality, Difference, and the Practical Problems of a New Feminism,” in Women in Christ: Toward a New Feminism, ed. Michele M. Schumacher (Grand Rapids, Michigan: William B. Eerdsman Publishing Co., 2004), 310-311.

Well, that’s my contribution for the day. Now, if you’ll pardon me, I must return to essay writing.

No Choice in Publicly Funded Abortions

by Marissa Poisson

It’s been a beautiful Easter weekend and signs of spring abound. There are buds on the trees, the birds are chirping and Canadians have emerged from hibernation. Yet I can’t help but think about the new lives that aren’t welcomed into the world. Abortion may not be a pleasant subject to contemplate on a sunny day, but recent events remind us that we are all involved whether we like it or not.

Abortion funding has been receiving a lot of attention lately with the United States’ health care reform and Canada’s G8 maternal and child health initiative. There was much debate in the U.S. about whether abortions should be publicly funded under the new legislation, and in the end Barack Obama signed an executive order against using tax dollars to pay for abortions, though it was seen as a largely symbolic gesture. It bears remembering that in Canada, where abortion is legal at any point during a pregnancy, publicly funded abortions are standard practice; taxpayers are billed over $80 million for the 100,000 abortions performed every year. However, we don’t stop at funding abortions domestically. The International Planned Parenthood Federation, the world’s largest abortion provider, has received $18 million from Canadian taxpayers over the past four years. Ottawa Students for Life has supported a petition that calls for the Government of Canada to cease this funding. The G8 maternal and child health initiative should be a noble, straightforward effort to provide women and children in developing countries with access to clean water, nutrition programs, inoculations and trained health care workers. Any aid dollars used to export abortion would be aid dollars taken away from those goals.

Interestingly, public funding of abortion doesn’t fit with some of the pro-choice rhetoric. If abortion is all about choice, why are those who oppose it nevertheless forced to fund it? Is an abortion really only between a woman and her doctor when it is paid for by the public? Of course, the financial cost should be the last reason used to oppose abortion. But we can’t say abortion doesn’t concern us when we’re funding it. By remaining silent, we remain complicit. Canadian tax dollars should be used to provide real support to women who are faced with challenging pregnancies because women and unborn children deserve better than abortion in Canada and around the world. This spring, let’s work together to celebrate and support life even when it is born of difficult circumstances.

“Alright you’ve got a point… but what do you want me to do about it?”

by Amanda Hennessey

I am a rational person. I ask questions, I doubt, and I do not trust something to be true without reasoning through every possibility. So when it comes to the question of abortion I had a lot of questions to answer. In my first year at university I had to take an ethics philosophy course (insert gag here). One of the topics we covered was abortion. Yes the professor did present a pro-life position, but it was a very poor one. To be honest we read and listened to him lecture for hours about how abortion is a women’s choice as it is in her body. That’s right; he did not argue the common “it is her body” but rather admitted that of course it is not her body. The baby is a total other person with its own heart, mind and soul. When we take pro-life training most of the course will be on how to prove that the fetus is in fact a child because if we can do this then the child automatically has the fundamental right to live right? Wrong. Well at least that’s what my professor argued. He wanted us to believe that carrying a pregnancy to term is an act out of the ordinary; mothers should be given daily thanks for their sacrifice and be treated as heroes. Didn’t you know? Pregnancy is not normal.

So every week, as I listened to my professor go on and on about how inconvenient childbirth is, I found myself getting progressively more and more upset. Is it fair that this man can brainwash hundreds of first year students with his garbage? Where is the voice for the voiceless? Yes, I did speak up often in class… and he very quickly learned my name and my opinions, but there had to be more that I could do.

In my second year I found the Ottawa Students for Life. And I was elated! For one year I was very involved with all of the events and gave my opinions at meetings. I started to find opportunities to speak to others about my views. Or maybe rather, these opportunities were already there before but I did not have the knowledge or confidence to take advantage of them. I hope that I was able to get others to start thinking, and not just believe that abortion is ok because the teachers and government say it is. Currently, I am finishing up my third year, and my first as an official member of the exec. Next year I will be starting my forth, and hopefully will be even more involved with the club. I hope that I can continue to learn, to question, and to find opportunities to share the truth.

But what about you? What can you, the reader, do to make a difference? First of all, if you are a student I encourage you to get involved with your pro-life club on campus. If you do not have one… why not start one? For more information and advice on joining clubs on campus feel free to e-mail us at ottawastudentsforlife@gmail.com.

For those of you not in school or just finishing up, you can help too! First of all, get educated. The more you know about these issues the more confident you will be to speak about them. And do speak about them. Share the message with your children, friends, neighbors, and acquaintances. You never know who they might be able to pass the message along to. Be supportive and compassionate. If you know someone who is thinking of having an abortion make sure that you remember that they are in a very stressful and sometimes tragic situation. In order to get more information and to know where to send someone experiencing an unexpected pregnancy please go to Birthright Ottawa or First Place Pregnancy Centre. Please also remember that it is important not to judge those who have had abortions and to be loving and compassionate with them. Find out where your Member of Parliament stands on the abortion issue. Send them letters and e-mails asking for their positions. Protest. Here in Ottawa there are many opportunities including the March for Life as well as the 40 Days for Life. And finally, pray. For those of you of faith, your prayers could save a life. You can make a difference.

Happy International Women’s Day!

by Rebecca Richmond

Now, I’ll admit that I have mixed feelings about the fact that there’s pretty much a day for everything under the sun. I mean, there’s Towel Day (think Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy), Pi Day, International Cat Day, World Rubber Day, World Turtle Day and the ever popular International Talk Like a Pirate Day to name a select few.

But regardless, let’s take the opportunity and better appreciate, celebrate, and honour women. I’m all for that. And while we’re doing that, let’s face a grim reality: missing women. Sex-selective abortion has resulted in a countless number of missing women in the world. In my mind, sex selective abortion is one of the manifestations of the way in which abortion oppresses women. It offers parents the “right to choose” to keep or kill their child on the basis of their child’s sex. China and India are two countries where this constitutes a major problem. But it’s also not illegal in Canada. You don’t need a reason to abort. And, by that logic, no reason to abort is wrong. There are laws in Canada that prohibit discrimination against women in employment, but no laws touch on killing your unborn child because she’s a female.

Hmm…. What wrong with this picture?

To borrow feminist terminology: abortion is a mechanism through which gender discrimination and oppression (a.k.a. patriarchy, although the term for feminists represents a more radical vision than the more commonly held conception) reproduces itself as a system that devalues women and violently intervenes within the mother’s womb to alter the composition of the family and the demographics of society.

Abortion hurts women. Not only the individual women who undergo abortions, not only the female babies whose lives are sacrificed on the altar of choice, but women in general. And so, today, Monday March 8th, I’m taking a moment to reflect. Yes, I’m tired and a bit worn out, but I can’t afford to take a break from pro-life. Too much is at stake.

Edit: Check out this article from The Economist about the same topic.

Pro-Woman. Pro-Life., starring Andrea Mrozek

by Dante De Luca

Allow me to take this opportunity to present to you a new entry in the annals of film. Andrea Mrozek stars in this all-new production of Pro Woman. Pro Life., which also features a guest appearance by our own Reita S. Filmed by Amanda Henessey and edited by Dante De Luca, this educational video is a must-see for pro-lifers and pro-choicers alike.

Women’s Rights

By Eliza Jane Phillis

As the Pro-Woman, Pro-Life event takes place tonight at the University of Ottawa campus in Lamoureux 122 at 7 p.m., I believe it is important to highlight the other victims of abortion: the women. As pro-lifers, we tend to become so focussed on the rights of the unborn that we forget that mothers are victims too. The unborn are not the only ones whose rights are being neglected by the abortion industry.

Women have the right to know all the facts and side-effects of every medical procedure they undergo; abortion is no exception. It has been attested by women who have had an abortion that they were not informed of the details of the surgery, the emotional scars or the possible life threatening and life altering physical side-effects.

Under Canadian legislation women have the freedom of choice but women have the right to make an informed decision. This means that they are given all information concerning ALL the side-effects of an abortion. As well as ALL the options available to them such as financial assistance and support for mothers as well as adoption.

Women have the right to be supported and loved even if the circumstances of their pregnancy is not what our society would deem desirable. This includes those self-proclaimed pro-lifers who would gossip and judge a women who is unexpectedly pregnant out of wed-lock…this is unacceptable and hypocritical.

Women have the right to be acknowledged when they suffer from the side-effects of abortion, and to receive caring and understanding counselling to help them accept the loss of their child and move forward in their lives.

These rights are not being respected today in our own society. We, as pro-life women and men, need to stand up for women’s rights.